Keeley Electronics Releases KO-ALS Distortion Pedal

Based on the Stahlhammer, the unit is limited to 100 pieces.

Edmond, OK (August 29, 2014) -- Keeley Electronics today announced it is building the KO-ALS distortion effect pedal to raise donations for ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease). The pedal will be limited to 100 units. The 100% hand-built effect pedal is based on the Keeley Stahlhammer and proceeds from the sale go to Project ALS. Project A.L.S. was founded in 1998, as a non-profit 501(c)3.

With controls for distortion, level, bass, mids, and treble, the KO-ALS makes it easy for players to dial in incredible amounts of heavy distortion. Modifications to the circuit allow for dual EQ system. A side-mounted switch will allow users to change the EQ contour between and Fender- and Marshall-type sounds.

The KO-ALS is hand-built in the USA using the finest components and construction techniques. It is housed in a beautifully powder-coated and rugged enclosure, includes true bypass switching, and features a 2-year limited lifetime warranty with world-class Keeley customer support.

The Keeley Electronics KO-ALS is a joint collaboration between Robert Keeley and Peter Gusmano and goes on sale Wednesday afternoon August 27, 2014 at noon Central Time for $179. A donation of $30 will be made from each pedal purchase.

Last time Keeley Electronics, Drive For A Cure and www.guitarforacure.com raised $1500 for www.ProjectALS.org Visit www.rkfx.com for more information about the full lineup of award-winning Keeley Electronics effects.

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Keeley Electronics

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