Magnetic Effects Releases the Zig Zag and Midphoria V2

An updated version of the company's flagship booster and a new dual-drive stomp.

London, UK (July 24, 2019) -- Magnetic Effects are pleased to release the Zig Zag.

The Zig Zag is dual stage drive pedal which combines a Jfet Preamp, which adds a tube style feel to the harmonics and pick attack, with a second opamp/diode based gain stage. The Gain and Preamp controls are voiced differently so that dialling in differing amounts of each changes the overall response of the feel, eq and gain characteristics.

The dual gain stages allow for a wide range of gain from low to singing saturation. Active Treble and Bass controls allow for plenty of tonal adjustment and the EQ toggle, with its three settings, make the Zig Zag easy to dial in to match your guitar and amp setup. Switching up or down from the stock middle post of the EQ switch changes the overall eq voicing of the pedal by adding increasing amounts of low and low mids. Plenty of output is available and a voltage doubler ensures the tone controls can operate across their full range without loss of headroom.

Features:

  • Jfet Preamp
  • Dual Gain stage
  • Volume, Gain, Treble, Bass, EQ and Preamp controls
  • Active Tone Controls
  • True Bypass
  • Top mounted Jacks/DC
  • Voltage Doubler
  • Standard 9V DC Operation

$175 street plus shipping



Magnetic Effects are pleased to release the Midphoria V2. The new version of the Midphoria adds a Width control (which alters the Q), a wider Sweep range and an internal voltage doubler for increased headroom.

Many classic lead tones were recorded with a wah left in one position instead of being rocked back and forwards. This is commonly referred to as ‘fixed’ or ‘parked’ wah. This sound has been used in some of the most famous recordings of all time by great artists such as Jimi Hendrix, Jimmy Page, Mark Knopfler, Mick Ronson, Michael Schenker and Marc Bolan to name just a few. The Midphoria allows you to access those classic tones in a smaller, more convenient pedal!

Unlike a traditional, large Wah Pedal where you have to move the treadle around to find the exact tone you are looking for when playing, the Midphoria allows you to dial in the ‘Sweet Spot’ using the Sweep Control. You can then access this tone by simply turning the pedal on and off using the foot switch. In addition, you can extend the frequency range with the Frequency toggle switch. The Clean Blend allows you to dial in the dry signal so you can balance the amount of Fixed Wah style mid boost. You can go from a subtle hint to all out mids!

The Clean Blend has enough output level to be used as a booster on its own. Turn down the Fixed Wah Volume and crank the up Clean Blend for a great sounding boost!

For more information:
Magnetic Effects

A maze of modulation and reverberations leads down many colorful tone vortices.

Deep clanging reverb tones. Unexpected reverb/modulation combinations.

Steep learning curve for a superficially simple pedal.

$209

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solidgoldfx.com

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