Epiphone Releases the B.B. King Lucille in Ebony

Epiphone, the accessible brand for every stage, has announced the worldwide release of the new B.B. King Lucille. The leading guitar brand has joined forces with the B.B. King Music Company to create a perfect replica of B.B. King's beloved Lucille. The historically accurate guitar will be available starting on October 19, in celebration of the legendary performer's birthday, at Authorized Gibson Dealers worldwide and on www.epiphone.com.


Epiphone is honored to present this B.B. King signature guitar, a perfect replica of his Lucille, to pay homage to the legendary career of one of music's greatest pioneers. Based on the famously named guitars of blues legend B.B. King, the Epiphone B.B. King Lucille in Ebony was inspired by the various Gibson ES models he played over the years--all of which were named Lucille. "We are honored to celebrate the life and spirit of B.B. King with this very special addition to Epiphone's Artist Collection," says Mat Koehler, Head of Product Development, Gibson Brands. "This Inspired by Gibson Lucille captures the legendary look, feel and tone of Lucille with all the classic appointments including the 6-position Varitone switch for ultimate versatility."

"It has been a pleasure working with the Gibson team in developing a new line of B.B. King Signature Lucille guitars," says Vassal Benford, CEO and Chairman, B.B. King Music Company). "I am especially proud of the new Epiphone guitar and delivering a true work of art that will be broadly accessible, awakening B.B. King's life and legacy to new artists. Gibson is a tremendous partner and they have demonstrated a sincere alignment with our mission to not only preserve the legacy of B.B. King, but to continue to grow his brand and expose a new generation of artists and fans to his music."

B.B. King Lucille

Spending his life sharing the music of his soul, the man born Riley B. King would grow up to be one of the most influential blues musicians of all time, being crowned "The King of the Blues." Releasing over 50 albums and 2400 master recordings along the way, The King of The Blues, gathered up other musicians in his wake and melded them into the harmony of his animating passion. As a 15-time GRAMMY Award Winner and the recipient of "The Recording Academy Lifetime Achievement Award," the King's global audience continues to expand worldwide and reaches over 90 million average yearly streams.

Fit for blues royalty, the new Epiphone B.B. King Lucille features historically--accurate construction and standout appointments including gold hardware, Grover Rotomatic tuners, a Graph Tech nut, ebony fretboard with pearloid block inlays, a brass truss rod cover with B.B. King's name engraved on it, a mother of pearl of "Lucille" inlay on the headstock face, multi-ply binding on the body and headstock, a TP-6 tailpiece with fine tuners and a semi-hollow-body with a maple center block to reduce feedback. Unlike most semi-hollowbody guitars, the B.B. King Lucille's top does not have any f-holes; B.B. King himself requested this feature to help further reduce the possibility of feedback. The electronics are equally impressive, with a six position Varitone switch, a pair of Alnico Classic PRO humbucking pickups wired to CTS potentiometers, and stereo and mono output jacks for maximum flexibility.

Can an entry-level modeler hang with the big dogs?

Excellent interface. Very portable. Nice modulation tones.

Some subpar low-gain dirt sounds. Could be a little more rugged.

$399

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