Gibson Launches the Jerry Cantrell Fire Devil and Atone Acoustic Guitars

Gibson partners with Alice in Chains co-founder Jerry Cantrell on the "Fire Devil" and "Atone" acoustic guitars.


​​The "Fire Devil" Songwriter​

The “Fire Devil” Songwriter will be limited to 100 special edition units and handmade by the expert luthiers and craftspeople of the Gibson Acoustic Custom Shop in Bozeman, Montana. Both acoustic guitars feature a Jerry Cantrell signature on the truss rod and a Double J waterslide decal on the band of the headstock. Presenting a “12” inlay on the 12th fret and gold hardware with gold Grover Mini Rotomatic tuners, as well as an L.R. Baggs VTC pickup and preamp, the Gibson Jerry Cantrell “Atone,” and “Fire Devil” acoustic guitars are ready to plug in wherever you are.

The "Atone" Songwriter

Made to Cantrell’s specifications and showcased in his recent video for the song “Atone,” the striking “Atone” Songwriter acoustic guitar features a thinner body depth and his signature “Circle In Square” pickguard. Cantrell’s specifications and showcased in his recent video for the song “Atone,” the striking “Atone” Songwriter acoustic guitar features a thinner body depth and his signature “Circle In Square” pickguard.

Last year, Jerry Cantrell released his new solo album Brighten. Co-produced by musician and composer Tyler Bates, and long-time engineer Paul Fig, Brighten features a diverse group of music luminaries including Duff McKagan (Guns N’ Roses) Greg Puciato (The Black Queen / Killer Be Killed / The Dillinger Escape Plan), as well as drummers Gil Sharone (Stolen Babies / The Dillinger Escape Plan) and Abe Laboriel Jr. (Paul McCartney). Additional supporting players include pedal steel master Michael Rozon, Vincent Jones on piano, Wurlitzer and organ, Jordan Lewis on piano, Matias Ambrogi-Torres on strings, and Lola Bates on additional backing vocals.

The Jerry Cantrell “Atone” and “Fire Devil” Songwriter acoustic guitars are available worldwide through authorized Gibson dealers and via www.gibson.com.

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