Lollar Releases Regal Humbucker for Jazzmasters

The newest version of the popular humbucker fits Jazzmaster-style dimensions.

While not totally new in design, the Regal For Jazzmaster is based on our popular Regal Humbucker, which is in turn based on the idea behind Fender's original Wide Range Humbucker (WRHB) pickups. Due to the larger dimensions of the WRHB design, they have been limited to a small number of guitar models. So we've modified the construction to accommodate for direct installation in Jazzmaster pickup routs to offer that same great tone to even more guitarists. Regal humbuckers offer a fat tone with clear top end sparkle and a vocal mid-range with great note definition. Original vintage instruments equipped with the Fender WRHB featured the same pickup for the neck and bridge positions, which caused an imbalance in tone and volume from the two positions. But we've modified our neck pickup to offer improvement in this area without sacrificing the characteristics that create the signature tone.


Regal For Jazzmaster

With three different wind specs (bridge, neck and low wind neck), players can tailor the pair to meet their individual needs. The standard neck is a great choice for people looking to maximize the balance between the two positions with a pair of Regal For Jazzmaster pickups, where as the low wind neck is best for people looking to brighten up and increase the articulation in the neck position, or for better balance when it's being paired with a lower output bridge pickup - such as a standard Jazzmaster, Telecaster, or other, similar singlecoil bridge pickups. The Regal For Jazzmaster is available with white, black, parchment, or cream covers to match almost any guitar's aesthetic.

The Regal For Jazzmaster pickup is available immediately for order. Retail/Street Price: $215 each.

For more info:

lollarguitars.com


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