Sheptone Miles

Proceeds from the sale of the pickup will be donated to further enhance research and education in hearing loss.

From classic cars to vintage guitars, short-lived designs are often the most sought-after. Sheptone goes the distance to achieve true vintage tone with the introduction of the Miles single coil bass pickup. Designed to accurately reproduce the tone of the milestone Fender 1951 Precision Bass, Sheptone's Miles bass pickup stays true to the original design specifications and can transform a contemporary bass guitar into a living legend.


Sheptone's construction begins with vintage-accurate fiberboard flatwork and Alnico 5 magnets for excellent performance. Plain enamel magnet wire, 42 AWG, is scatterwound for great harmonics and string-wrapped to protect the single coil. Average resistance is 7.32kohms.

The single-coil design of the Miles bass pickup has a dynamic response that delivers classic, smooth sound with a fat, yet tight, low-end. By simply rolling back the tone, players can walk right into a classic upright bass riff. This is vintage bass tone at its finest.

Introducing the Miles Pickup from Sheptone

The Sheptone Miles 1951 P Bass Pickup Demo by Steve Cook

The single-coil design of the Miles bass pickup has a dynamic response that delivers classic, smooth sound with a fat, yet tight, low-end. By simply rolling back the tone, players can walk right into a classic upright bass riff. This is vintage bass tone at its finest.

While the classic P Bass served as the true-vintage inspiration for the Miles bass pickup, a special cause is the true heart and soul of Sheptone's design. The son of Nashville bassist Steve Cook, 4-year-old Miles, was diagnosed with hearing loss and recently received life-changing cochlear implants. Miles and the Cook family are staying the course and overcoming obstacles on their journey, and Sheptone wants to help others do the same. Proceeds from the sale of the namesake Miles bass pickup will be donated to further enhance research and education in hearing loss.

$109.00 USD

For more information:
Sheptone

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