The PA-1 RB is loaded with the company's new Retroblast mini humbuckers.

Pete Anderson Signature PA-1 RB

Toledo, OH (July 17, 2020) -- This summer, Reverend Guitars is releasing a Reverend Jetstream 390 dedicated to the punk icon, Ron Asheton -- a founding member of The Stooges. He played a Jetstream 390 during The Stooges reunion juggernaut. The Reverend Ron Asheton Signature Jetstream 390 is in Ashton’s favorite Rock Orange and sports a lightning bolt trio decal on the upper horn. The image initially was a logo for Naylor Amps, and also appeared on Asheton’s Signature Reverend Volcano.

Asheton’s Reverend Jetstream 390 was stolen, along with all of The Stooges’ other gear, in Montreal in 2008. The guitar has since disappeared, along with the Reverend Ron Asheton Signature Volcano prototype and a host of other Stooges gear.

Reverend Guitars’ first signature model with Ron Asheton was a Volcano – a V-shaped guitar – with 3 P90 pickups. It mainly came in Rock Orange, but there were Midnight Black and Ice White versions as well. All Reverend Ron Asheton Signature Volcanos had the three lightning bolt decals.

Like all Reverend Guitars, this guitar has a Korina body. A Boneite nut and locking tuners, Reverend’s Bass Contour Control, and a dual-action truss rod are all for maximum performance. You can’t be different if you’re playing what everyone else is.

The Reverend Pete Anderson Signature PA-1 RB is the latest installment in Reverend Guitars’ PA-1 full-hollow body series equipped with Reverend’s new-for-2020 Retroblast pickups. The mini-humbuckers have a percussive, yet smooth tone backed with plenty of power for classic power chord crunch or Rockabilly blues rhythms.

Pete Anderson wanted a classic hollow sound and look for the series, but with the ability to play at higher volumes without uncontrollable feedback. So, Reverend developed the innovative Uni-Brace, that not only addresses feedback, but also enhances sustain, durability, and clarity. Other unique features of this guitar include bushing-mounted bridge, “R” embossed knobs, back sprayed/logoed pickguard, and 15th fret neck/body joint for better high-fret access.

Pete Anderson is a Grammy-award winning artist and producer best known for his critically acclaimed guitar work and production of Dwight Yoakam. He has also produced artists such as The Meat Puppets, Jackson Browne, and Buck Owens. In addition to the more than 20 albums he released with Yoakam, Anderson has released seven solo albums and appeared on droves of others.

For more information:
Reverend Guitars

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