Rock N Roll Relics announce the debut of the Jet Model, available in a single or double cut body shape.

RNRR

San Francisco, CA (November 16, 2017) -- Rock N Roll Relics announces the debut of the Jet Model, available in a single or double-cut body shape.

The Jet model is a 24.75” scale with a 12” radius fingerboard. The back carve profile is .800 at the 1st fret and 1.020 at the 12th. Nut width is 1-11/16”. The body thickness is 1-38” which gives this model an extremely ultra light weight feel. The finish work features a thin lacquer skin that is available with an aged or non aged standard color. Pickup body routs are universal for multiple pickup options. The pickups and electronics mount directly to the guard which allows an easy swap for different style pickups if desired. The guitar comes strung up with Dunlop 10-46 stainless steel strings and includes a custom G&G hard shell case.

Rock N Roll Relics is a boutique American-made guitar brand founded in 2005 by guitarist Billy Rowe. A few artists who play RNRR are Billie Joe Armstrong, Peter Buck, Rick Nielsen, Bruce Kulick, Gilby Clarke & Tracii Guns. Rock N Roll Relics are available through dealers throughout the world.

  • Body: Two piece lightweight African mahogany.
  • Neck: African mahogany with a rosewood fingerboard.
  • Frets: Jescar 45/100 medium jumbo frets.
  • Hardware: Kluson tuners, Advanced Platting locking wrap around bridge or Tone Pros AVT2.
  • Pickups: Lollar + Options available
  • Electronics: Emerson Custom potentiometers, switchcraft 3 way toggle
  • Capacitors: .022 Russian Military
  • Starting Price: $2,199.00

For more information:
Rock N Roll Relics

A compact pedal format preamp designed to offer classic, natural bass tone with increased tonal control and extended headroom.

Read MoreShow less

In their corner, from left to right: Wilco’s Pat Sansone (guitars, keys, and more), drummer Glenn Kotche, Jeff Tweedy, bassist John Stirratt, guitarist Nels Cline, and keyboardist Mikael Jorgensen.

Photo by Annabel Merhen

How Jeff Tweedy, Nels Cline, and Pat Sansone parlayed a songwriting hot streak, collective arrangements, live ensemble recording, and twangy tradition into the band’s new “American music album about America.”

Every artist who’s enjoyed some level of fame has had to deal with the parasocial effect—where audiences feel an overly intimate connection to an artist just from listening to their music. It can lead some listeners to believe they even have a personal relationship with the artist. I asked Jeff Tweedy what it feels like to be on the receiving end of that.

Read MoreShow less

Luthier Maegen Wells recalls the moment she fell in love with the archtop and how it changed her world.

The archtop guitar is one of the greatest loves of my life, and over time it’s become clear that our tale is perhaps an unlikely one. I showed up late to the archtop party, and it took a while to realize our pairing was atypical. I had no idea that I had fallen head-over-heels in love with everything about what’s commonly perceived as a “jazz guitar.” No clue whatsoever. And, to be honest, I kind of miss those days. But one can only hear the question, “Why do you want to build jazz guitars if you don’t play jazz?” so many times before starting to wonder what the hell everyone’s talking about.

Read MoreShow less
x