how to record

Reverse Multitracking | Recording Dojo FINAL

How cutting tracks in reverse, then reversing those reversed tracks, will add zing to your mixes.

Hello and welcome to another Dojo! Since this issue is dedicated to all things acoustic, I thought I’d share a fun technique that I call “harmonic clouds.” It involves learning a section of your song backwards, recording it, reversing the new recording, and placing it back in the appropriate spot (or not!). I usually do this with acoustic guitars, but it can be applied with equal aplomb to electrics and can supercharge your creativity. Tighten up! The Dojo is now open.

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Compared to traditional speaker simulators, IRs offer much greater realism and depth.

I find the evolution of rock guitar tone to be a fascinating subject. A ‘59 Fender Bassman cranked up through its internal 4x10” speaker configuration sounds nothing like a Mesa Dual Rectifier through its oversized, closed-back 4x12” cabinet with Celestion Vintage 30s. And the speakers and speaker cabinet are a huge part of the equation—if you were to run the Mesa Recto into the Bassman speakers, you’d get a completely different tone, but one that leans in the classic Bassman direction.

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