tools

This motorized tuner promises to tune your guitar for you—is it too good to be true? The PG Band Industries Roadie 3 review.

 

Ratings

Pros:
Tons of instrument flexibility and tuning presets. Convenient built-in metronome.

Cons:
Not for bass. Doesn’t display note names.

Street:
$129

Band Industries Roadie 3
roadiemusic.com


Ease of Use:


Build/Design:


Value:
 
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Even CNC machines rely on hard tooling to accurately position and hold parts like this freshly carved neck.

Look beyond a stunning guitar, and you’ll likely find equally stunning tooling that brought the instrument to life.

Those of you foolish enough to have read my previous writings know how much I adore guitars and the bric-a-brac that goes along with them. Since one of my favorite things about building is the design and execution of hard tooling, I’ve also subjected you to my pontification on tools that are used to make instruments. Without these nifty little (and not-so-little) items, your guitar might never have been born. In fact, most every part of the process relies upon tooling of some kind.

As essential and ubiquitous as it is, hard tooling is one mysterious aspect of guitar making that doesn’t get much screen time. Its younger sibling, CAD/CAM (computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing) hogs most of the publicity nowadays, probably because of its digital status. But it’s interesting to note that even CNC machinery—the automated equipment that runs on CAD and CAM programs—can’t function without hard-tooling design.

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