TC Electronic Announces Free TonePrint Editor

Los Angeles, CA (January 23, 2013) – TC Electronic announces the TonePrint Editor, the free software that allows guitarists and bassists to craft their own version of a TonePrint

Los Angeles, CA (January 23, 2013) – TC Electronic announces the TonePrint Editor, the free software that allows guitarists and bassists to craft their own version of a TonePrint effect pedal. Following the massive success of TonePrint pedals and signature effects by the best in music today, the guitar community has been screaming for access to the TonePrint pedal parameters in order to create their own custom sounds. TC Electronic has not been deaf to the massive demands and is pleased to announce the TonePrint Editor as a completely free download at tcelectronic.com/toneprint-editor. The TonePrint Editor will be released March 23rd 2013.

The Toneprint Editor allows guitarists to build their own custom version of a Toneprint editor from the ground up, from sounds to the range of knobs and everything in between. An intuitive slider-based UI, realtime changes and easy storing of sounds allows guitarists and bassists alike to easily and quickly craft the sounds they want to hear and pair them with the best TC Electronic effects out there.

But what really sets the TonePrint editor apart is the depth with which guitarists and bassists can craft tones. Far from ‘be-all-end-all’ pedals where the only real difference is which preset you load into the pedal, the TonePrint Editor starts at zero, and from there anything is possible, from the function and range of knobs to effect parameter behavior and everything in between.

TonePrint Editor Main Features
• Build Custom Versions of Renowned TC Effects from Scratch
• Complete Control over All Effect Parameters and Effect Behavior
• Customizable Knob Functions and Knob Range
• Intuitive Slider-based Interface
• Live Auditioning of Sounds – Make Changes on the Fly and Get Direct Results
• Absolutely Free
• Available for PC and Mac.

For more information:
www.tcelectronic.com

Rig Rundown: Adam Shoenfeld

Whether in the studio or on solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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