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TWA Releases the DM-02 Dynamorph Harmonic Generator

TWA Releases the DM-02 Dynamorph Harmonic Generator

The pedal can create an almost limitless variety of distortion & filtering effects.

Clifton, NJ (March 27, 2017) -- Featuring a distortion circuit where the amount and type of saturation is intricately linked to the input signal level, the TWA DM-02 Dynamorph creates multi-layered, highly complex waveforms that “morph” your instrument’s harmonic structure in bizarre yet decidedly musical ways. Add to this an envelope-detection circuit that controls distortion events via playing dynamics, and you have the extremely powerful tool for musical expression that is Dynamorph.

The DM-02 can create an almost limitless variety of distortion & filtering effects, from mild drive to “starved-voltage” fuzz to massive, swept filter synth pads. The degree of any of these effects is determined by the playing dynamics of the user, making Dynamorph a truly personal experience.

The TWA Dynamorph offers the following features:

  • Unlimited range of sounds, from mild drive to extreme fuzz to massive synth filter sweeps.
  • Dynamically responsive to input signal. The input directly controls type/degree of distortion event.
  • Dual cascading preamps – Each with independent level control.
  • Ovid/Kafka mode switch – offers two different EQ curves as well as an obscure literary reference.
  • Switchable “Morph” function allows envelope control of the distortion effect.
  • Dedicated dry level control – allows user to blend in dry signal to taste.
  • S3 “Shortest Send” relay-based true-bypass switching for transparent operation in bypass.
  • Optional expression pedal control of gain level for additional effects.
  • “Butterfly” LED array reacts to playing dynamics.
  • 3-year warranty
  • Made in USA
  • Street Price $299

For more info on TWA products including video demos of the DM-02 Dynamorph, please visit our website www.godlyke.com, e-mail us at info@godlyke.com or call us at 973-777- 7477

For more information:
Godlyke

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