Xotic Guitars Releases the XGC and XGC Jr.
Xotic XGC

Both models feature a 24 9/16" scale length and a 10" fretboard radius.

Van Nuys, CA (July 10, 2014) -- Building on its reputation for making high quality electric guitars and basses, Xotic announced the new XGC guitar. The XGC sports a non-traditional, double cutaway shape, 24 9/16-inch scale length with 10-inch fingerboard radius neck, and figured maple body with mahogany top.

Are you looking for elegance, something sultry, and a personality capable of singing sweetly, or something bold, with the ability to create its own thunder? Then the XGC beckons you! Its highly figured maple top over mahogany body and dual humbuckers make it a great choice for any style of music. The XGC, built to strict standards, is backed by Xotic’s dedication to quality and craftsmanship.

Specs:

  • 24 9/16-inch scale length neck
  • 10-inch fretboard radius
  • 22 frets
  • An option of either a mahogany neck with ebony fingerboard or a maple neck with birds eye maple fingerboard
  • A figured maple body with mahogany top
  • Two humbucker pickups
  • Tremolo arm

XGC – Direct Pricing: $2,900


Xotic XGC-Jr.

Following alongside its big brother, the Xotic XGC, the new Xotic XGC-Jr. is a non-traditional, double cutaway, solid mahogany body guitar with a 24 9/16-inch scale length, 10-inch radius, solid mahogany neck, and includes Seymour Duncan SP-90 pickups. Our Xotic XGC-Jr. is built for shear power and potency, and is perfect for rock and blues.

  • 24 9/16-inch scale length neck
  • 10-inch fretboard radius
  • 22 frets
  • Mahogany neck with rosewood fingerboard
  • Mahogany body
  • P-90 style pickups
  • Tremolo arm

For more information:
Xotic

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