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Aguilar Amplification Announces the AG 4J-HC and AG 5J-HC Pickups

As a direct replacement for 4 and 5-string Fender Jazz and other J-style basses, these split-coil pickups give you noiseless Jazz Bass tone that works for all playing styles.

New York, NY (July 26, 2012) – Aguilar Amplification is pleased to announce the AG 4J-HC and AG 5J-HC hum-canceling pickup sets. As a direct replacement for 4- and 5-string Fender Jazz and other J-style basses, these split-coil pickups give you noiseless Jazz Bass tone that works for all playing styles.

With traditional single-coil pickups, bassists are plagued by hum when the neck and bridge pickups are at different volume levels. While other hum-canceling pickups tackle the noise, you are left with thinner lows, a harsher midrange and a lack of dynamics.

The Aguilar hum-canceling pickups feature a split-coil design that allows you to get any pickup level combination without 60-cycle hum - all while retaining the natural, organic tone of your bass. Now you can experience the deep, resonant low-end of the neck pickup or solo the bridge pickup for that sought-after midrange cut without annoying hum!

Wound in Aguilar’s NYC factory, the HC pickups use 42 gauge Formvar wire and Alnico V magnets for the big, dynamic tone that Aguilar pickups are known for.

The AG 4J-HC pickups will be available in July 2012 and carry a street price of $189.00. The AG 5J-HC pickups will be available shortly afterwards with a street price of $219.00.

For more information:
www.aguilaramp.com

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