Amptweaker Introduces the Amptweaker Jr. Distortion Series

The series includes the TightRock Jr., TightDrive Jr., and TightMetal Jr.

Cumming, GA (February 2, 2016) -- With ever-shrinking pedalboard real estate, a common request to Amptweaker has been for smaller footprint versions of our popular distortion pedals, introducing the Amptweaker Jr Distortion Series featuring the TightRock Jr, TightDrive Jr and TightMetal Jr. These pedals share most of the tone-tweaking features available on their larger counterparts, while eliminating effects loops, lit controls, battery switches and boost features that some players don’t need in order to shrink down the size and weight.

Derived from our Pro series, the Tight control and Fat switches were re-configured into a 3-position Fat/Normal/Tight switch to dial in the attack of the notes from thick and heavy to aggressive and chunky. An EQ switch similarly provides Plexi(Thrash on TMJR)/Normal/Smooth tone settings, which helps the pedals cover much of the range of both their Fat and Tight parents. In addition to Gain, Tone and Volume knobs, there’s also a manually-adjustable Noise Gate which can be cranked to stop notes hard and fast.

The pedals all include true bypass switching, 9-18VDC operation, and a thumbscrew-removable bottom plate with special holes to even accommodate tie-wrap or screw-in pedalboard attachment methods.

For more information:
Amptweaker

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