Epiphone recreates Joan Jett's favorite stage guitar, offering a lightweight, stage-ready instrument with a PowerHammer PRO humbucker and signature "Kill Switch" toggle.

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The lineup takes cues from the now highly sought-after “Japanese Vintage” reissues from the early ‘80s.

The JV Modified Series combines classic aesthetics with modern playability to suit the needs of today’s guitarist. Taking cues from the now highly sought-after “Japanese Vintage” reissues from the early ‘80s. For the player seeking classic Fender instruments with a twist, the JV Modified Series delivers a unique combination of vintage Fender with modern playability.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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