The pedal uses a buffered input section, transformer-based pickup simulation, new production 5% 1/2-watt carbon composition resistors, metallized polyester film capacitors, Sprague and BC electrolytic capacitors, and low-gain, hand-matched NOS silicon transistors.

Akron, OH (May 10, 2017) -- The Erupter is the result of over two years’ worth of tone-chasing, tweaking, and experimentation in search of what EarthQuaker president and product designer Jamie Stillman calls “the ultimate classic fuzz tone . . . with a big low end, but not too mushy, a biting top end without being too harsh, and just enough output to politely send a tube amp over the top.”

In developing the Erupter, Stillman “[used] every trick [he] ever learned” to craft a fuzz Device that sounds good with any pickup type anywhere in the effects chain, even before a wah pedal, and without any impedance mismatching. To this end, the Erupter uses a buffered input section, transformer-based pickup simulation, new production 5% ½ watt carbon composition resistors, metallized polyester film capacitors, Sprague and BC electrolytic capacitors, and low-gain, hand-matched NOS silicon transistors to deliver a “well-rounded and defined fuzz tone with just enough pummeling intensity.”

The Erupter’s simple control set stands in stark relief of its rigorous design process. A single control labeled “Bias” adjusts the amount of voltage fed to the NOS silicon transistors. Low “Bias” settings yield a rude, spongy fuzz tone with plenty of sag and a blossoming attack envelope that’s gated without entering “dying battery” territory. As the “Bias” control is increased, additional harmonics stack atop the input signal, producing a stiffer, more complex fuzz tone with a tighter response, increased output, and longer sustain. The Erupter uses a fixed output level and gain setting for the “thickest fuzz possible,” and to “push the full frequency range of the guitar out front when you kick it on.”

The Erupter is available at EarthQuaker Devices dealers worldwide on May 10, 2017.

Erupter Features

  • Classic Fuzz Tone
  • Overloaded-yet-refined full-force fuzz with crushing lows and smooth top end that’s touch-responsive and reacts to changes in guitar volume and tone controls
  • “Bias” control adjusts fuzz character for unique tonal variations
  • True bypass
  • Silent relay-based switching
  • All-analog signal path
  • Lifetime guarantee
  • Each and every Erupter is built by the hands of real-life dream warriors in the foothills of Mt. Akron, Ohio.

Watch the company's video demo:

For more information:
EarthQuaker Devices

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