Electro-Harmonix Introduces the Volume, Pan, and Expression Pedals to The Next Step Effects Line

New York City, NY (September 25, 2012) – Sharing all the attributes of the ground-breaking Crying Tone Wah, these three new pedals have no moving parts and feature the

New York City, NY (September 25, 2012) – Sharing all the attributes of the ground-breaking Crying Tone Wah, these three new pedals have no moving parts and feature the same, smooth, rocking chassis for exceptional control plus bypass switching that is completely silent. They do not use a potentiometer, optics or magnetism.

The Volume Pedal permits precise and very expressive control over the volume of an instrument. It features a buffered bypass output and can be powered by a 9V battery or an optional 9.6V AC Adaptor. The Volume Pedal has a U.S. List Price of $117.60.

The Expression Pedal delivers accurate, highly responsive control over expression or control-voltage capable effects and instruments. It is equipped with a Range dial which controls the Heel setting of the pedal’s sweep and enables the player to increase or decrease the expression sweep range. A Reverse button reverses the direction of the Expression pedal’s output. The pedal ships with a ¼″ TRS cable and a 9V battery. It can also be powered by an optional 9.6V AC Adaptor. The Expression Pedal has a U.S. List Price of $117.60.

The PAN Pedal is extremely responsive and affords meticulous control over the stereo imaging of a musical instrument(s). The pedal can also be used to pan one input to two outputs, blend two inputs to one output or as a mono or stereo volume pedal. It has a U.S. List Price of $116.00.

All three pedals are in stock and shipping now.

For more information:
www.ehx.com

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