The pedal includes 11 different flavors of reverb along with a mode button that offers up to three variations of each.

New York, NY (May 30, 2018) -- Electro-Harmonix introduces the Oceans 11, a compact pedal with advanced functionality that features 11 reverb styles ranging from essential to exotic. The Oceans 11’s reverbs are:

Features:

  • 1. HALL – reverb characteristic of a grand concert hall
  • 2. SPRING – pays homage to vintage Fender tube reverbs
  • 3. PLATE – a lush plate reverb
  • 4. REVRS – emulates the reverse reverb effect created in studios where a note’s reverb fades-in backwards
  • 5. ECHO – reverb plus delay, a digital delay feeds into the Plate reverb
  • 6. TREM – reverb plus tremolo applied to both the wet and dry mix of a Hall reverb
  • 7. MOD – modulated reverb, a combination of various modulations creates rich reverb tails
  • 8. DYNA – three dynamic reverb algorithms: swell, gate and duck
  • 9. AUTO-INF – Auto infinite reverb that triggers a reverb wash for each note or chord. When a new one is struck, the previously resounding reverb wash crossfades to the new one
  • 10. SHIM – Shimmer generates a rich octave-shifted reverb wash
  • 11. POLY – Polyphonic reverb, two configurable bi-directional pitch shifts

The Oceans 11’s Mode button lets the user select up to three variations of many of its reverbs for greater variety. The pedal also features powerful, yet intuitive “hidden” parameters accessible thru its Secondary Knob Mode that enable the player to take greater control of its effects.

An internal Tails switch provides a choice of whether the reverb effect fades out naturally or stops immediately when the pedal is switched to bypass. In most settings the pedal is also capable of producing infinite reverb which can be played over with a fresh reverb effect complete with adjustable parameters.

The Oceans 11 comes equipped with a standard EHX 9.6DC200mA power supply, is available now and features a U.S. Street Price of $147.80.

Watch the company's video demo:

For more information:
Electro-Harmonix

On Black Midi's Cavalcade, Geordie Greep’s fretwork is an example of the 6-string as a capable component as much as a solo instrument, never completely stealing the show.

Popular music and mainstream tastes may be more fractured than ever, but the guitar continues to thrive.

As we soft launch into the new year, I’m not waiting for the requisite guitar obituary in the news. It’s not going to happen again anytime soon. Why? Because as far as the mainstream media is concerned, our beloved instrument is not only dead, it's irrelevant to the point of not even being an afterthought. When the New York Times published their most recent albums of the year list, there was barely a guitar-based recording to be found. Still, there is not only hope, but also cause for jubilation.

Read More Show less

Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

{u'media': u'[rebelmouse-document-pdf 13574 site_id=20368559 original_filename="7Shred-Jan22.pdf"]', u'file_original_url': u'https://roar-assets-auto.rbl.ms/documents/13574/7Shred-Jan22.pdf', u'type': u'pdf', u'id': 13574, u'media_html': u'7Shred-Jan22.pdf'}
Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
Read More Show less
x