Fender Unveils Geddy Lee and Steve Harris Signature Basses

The Geddy Lee Jazz Bass is a new version that combines the specs and features of Lee’s three favorite basses.

Scottsdale, AZ (January 22, 2015) -- Fender is proud to announce the release of several new artist signature bass guitars at the 2015 NAMM Show.

Steve Harris’s galloping fleet-fingered basslines have turbocharged U.K. metal titans Iron Maiden for decades and have made him the most influential metal bassist alive. Harris has stayed true to his battle-hardened Precision Bass over the years, and his signature Steve Harris Precision Bass now comes in his famously regal gloss White finish with special pinstriping, mirrored pickguard and West Ham United F.C. crest. Other ironclad features include a single powerful Seymour Duncan Steve Harris signature model pickup, Fender High Mass bridge, Rotosound Steve Harris Signature flat-wound strings and Harris’s signature on the back of the headstock. Available February 17, 2015.

Bassists have loved the signature Geddy Lee Jazz Bass for years. The new U.S.A. Geddy Lee Jazz Bass is a new version that combines the specs and features of Lee’s three favorite basses—two Fender Custom Shop versions of his signature model and the original sleek black ’72 Jazz Bass that Rush’s revered bassist/ vocalist has riffed away on in front of millions of devoted fans worldwide and on many a mega-selling album. The neck has a thicker custom profile, topped by a maple fingerboard with elegant white binding and white pearloid block inlays. For enormous tone that crackles with life and bristles with the energy, its two vintage-style single-coil Jazz Bass pickups are specially wound and voiced to sound like those on Lee’s prized 1972 original, and a Geddy Lee signature High-Mass bridge provides rock-solid intonation. Available March 12, 2015.

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