Jade Puget and Hunter Burgan chronicle the working-man instruments, all-tube heads, and select noisemakers they rely on to achieve their evolved punk tones.

PG’s Chris Kies hung with guitarist Jade Puget and bassist Hunter Burgan (above right) before the band’s recent Nashville gig at War Memorial Auditorium. Jade explains why he goes with Gibson Les Paul Studios while Hunter describes his need for big-and-bulky tube heads in a world of on-the-go mini bass heads.

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This rare English Tonemaster was made circa 1957.

The Valco-produced English Tonemaster is a rare, lap-steel-inspired gem from the 1950s—when genres and guitar design were fluid.

The 1950s were a peculiar time for the electric guitar. Innovators, designers, and tinkerers were pushing the boundaries of the instrument, while musicians were experimenting with various playing techniques and sounds. There was an evolution of sorts (or de-evolution, depending on your slant) from solidbody “sit-down” guitars, like pedal and lap steels, to “stand-up” or “upright” solidbody electrics. If you look at an early Fender catalog—let’s say from 1953—you’ll see the Telecaster (and Esquire), the Precision Bass, and then a whole bunch of steel guitars. There was a shift underway, and many manufacturers began to blur the lines of what a guitar should look, sound, and play like.

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PRS Guitars and John Mayer officially announce the PRS SE Silver Sky, an affordable version of the original with PRS trademark bird inlays and three single-coil pickups.

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