Quick Hit: RJM Mastermind LT Review

An affordable, high-quality, and easy-to-use MIDI controller that isn’t the size of Saskatchewan.

Pedalboards are growing. Interest in better controlling them is blossoming, too, which means increasing diversity in cost and complexity of switching systems. The MIDI-enabled Mastermind LT is from the streamlined school of switcher design, but simplicity conceals a flexible, potent device. Our test LT came on a board with MIDI-enabled effects like the Eventide H9 and Strymon TimeLine, so we could explore the ease of accessing, storing, and recalling presets from pedals with deep functionality.

The interface is simple and elegant in execution and practice. The display is easy to read in just about any light. Better still, programming presets (you can create as many as 768 using up to 16 connected devices) is simple, logical, and easy to swing on the fly if you discover new sounds at soundcheck or practice. And the contrasting worlds you can create and navigate using just a few MIDI-enabled pedals are impressive. The tag of $399 isn’t cheap, given that you also need to purchase a loop switcher (ours came with RJM’s $349 Mini Effect Gizmo). But if you want a switcher with a smaller footprint, the easy-to-use LT is a high-quality and highly creative tool.

Test gear: Fender Champ, Fender Jaguar, pedalboard featuring Strymon Mobius, Strymon TimeLine, Eventide H9, Ibanez Tube Screamer Mini, Xotic SP Compressor, Mooer Juicer, and Mission Engineering Expression Pedal.

 

Ratings

Pros:
High quality. Easy to navigate.

Cons:
Slightly expensive given lack of loop switcher.

Street:
$399

RJM Mastermind LT
rjmmusic.com

Ease of Use:

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