The rising blues guitar star demos her No. 1 SG with her expanded pedalboard, and goes deep with her workhorse Jaguars, Stogie Blues cigar box, Delaney 512, Taylor acoustic, and Category 5 amps.

Rising blues guitar star Samantha Fish returned to Nashville for two packed nights at 3rd & Lindsley, on tour behind her excellent new album, Kill or Be Kind. Listening to the 10 albums she’s recorded over as many years, her evolution is audible and impressive. Fish’s playing reaches a fresh creative peak on her latest, as a songwriter, vocalist, and player. She’s consistently inventive and dynamic, and many of her solos boldly leap outside the box, with wild string-bending and ear-catching octave and delay effects, and she possesses a large tonal vocabulary, thanks to a collection of road guitars that include Fender Jaguars, a trusty Delaney semi-hollowbody, a raunchy cigar box, and her No. 1 white Gibson SG. We caught up with Fish on September 19, before the first show of her two-night Music City stand, and she displayed how much her arsenal of gear and sounds has grown since her first Rig Rundown, in January 2013.


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D'Addario Trigger Capo: ddar.io/Trigger.Capos



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We’re almost finished with the aging process on our project guitar. Let’s work on the fretboard, nut, and truss rod cover, and prepare the headstock for the last hurrah.

Hello and welcome back to Mod Garage. This month we’ll continue with our relic’ing project, taking a closer look at the front side of the neck and treating the fretboard and the headstock. We’ll work on the front side of the headstock in the next part, but first we must prepare it.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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