http://www.premierguitar.com PG's Jordan Wagner walks us through his latest print review--the Stadler Goldtop Solidbody electric (featured in the February 2011 issue of Premier Guitar magazine). The Stadler Goldtop features a butternut body with ivoroid binding, a choice of either one or two singlecoil pickups, a two-piece, 25.625" scale maple neck with a maple fingerboard (that Wagner describes as being as "fat as a baseball bat...and one of the best riffing necks I've ever played." In addition it features replica Kluson tuners and includes a Cedar Creek case. For more Video Reviews, or to view all the guitar-specific news, updates, videos, photo gallerys, features, and reviews you can handle, be sure to visit http://www.premierguitar.com



http://www.premierguitar.com PG's Jordan Wagner walks us through his latest print review--the Stadler Goldtop Solidbody electric (featured in the February 2011 issue of Premier Guitar magazine).

The Stadler Goldtop features a butternut body with ivoroid binding, a choice of either one or two singlecoil pickups, a two-piece, 25.625" scale maple neck with a maple fingerboard (that Wagner describes as being as "fat as a baseball bat...and one of the best riffing necks I've ever played." In addition it features replica Kluson tuners and includes a Cedar Creek case.

For more Video Reviews, or to view all the guitar-specific news, updates, videos, photo gallerys, features, and reviews you can handle, be sure to visit http://www.premierguitar.com

This rare English Tonemaster was made circa 1957.

The Valco-produced English Tonemaster is a rare, lap-steel-inspired gem from the 1950s—when genres and guitar design were fluid.

The 1950s were a peculiar time for the electric guitar. Innovators, designers, and tinkerers were pushing the boundaries of the instrument, while musicians were experimenting with various playing techniques and sounds. There was an evolution of sorts (or de-evolution, depending on your slant) from solidbody “sit-down” guitars, like pedal and lap steels, to “stand-up” or “upright” solidbody electrics. If you look at an early Fender catalog—let’s say from 1953—you’ll see the Telecaster (and Esquire), the Precision Bass, and then a whole bunch of steel guitars. There was a shift underway, and many manufacturers began to blur the lines of what a guitar should look, sound, and play like.

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PRS Guitars and John Mayer officially announce the PRS SE Silver Sky, an affordable version of the original with PRS trademark bird inlays and three single-coil pickups.

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