The latest version of the popular Amplitube series of recording software is now available.

Modena, Italy (March 3, 2010) – IK Multimedia has announced that AmpliTube 3 is now shipping. If you haven't yet read about the latest version, here's a massive list of features and improvements from IK Multimedia:
More Gear. In fact, twice as much gear!
- Over 160 gear models included (with nearly 100 added models), more than double the amount of other packages, from the most sought-after vintage collections to modern-day workhorses
- 51 Stompbox effects, 31 Amps, 46 Cabinets, 15 Studio Mics and 17 Rack effects
- 30 brand new models for the most complete anthology of gear, ever
- 70 re-worked and superior sounding models from packages like AmpliTube Metal and AmpliTube Jimi Hendrix
- A new collection of bass gear models also makes it the most complete package for recording and performance of bass by the engineer or musician
- Can be directly expanded with packages like AmpliTube Fender, Ampeg SVX and future packages
- New preset management and keyword system allows you to organize and quickly recall the massive library of included and custom preset tones



More Feel. Nothing even comes close.
- New cabinet module inside now provides double miking per cabinet, with freely movable microphones thanks to IK’s VRM (Volumetric Response Modeling) technology, giving you a level of control and sound accuracy never experienced before in software
- All models in AmpliTube 3 have been ultra-accurately “remastered” with our new 3rd generation modeling technology (the same found in AmpliTube Fender), using IK’s exclusive DSM technology (Dynamic Saturation Modeling), then painstakingly compared with the originals in “A/B” style to ensure that the sound you hear from the software is the same sound you’ll be hearing from the gear.
- New impulse-based reverbs are now used in the entire chain, from spring reverb to room ambience, which ensures the most realistic possible representation of your recording environment
- New rotary speaker module sets the new standard for accurate emulation of these types of cabinets – until now, there had never been such a great sounding rotary cabinet in software

More Power. Unleash more creative power.
- New creative Effects: featuring the new Step Filter, Step Slicer, TapDelay, Rezo and Swell stomp and rack effects that allow you to sculpt your sound and create inspiring rhythmic patterns or amazing drone and pad-like effects
- New full-stereo path allows you to use the huge collection of analog and digital effects on your vocal tracks, keyboards and drums
- New Drag & Drop functions in the stomp and rack modules make experimenting with effects’ combinations a breeze
- New “MIDI Learn” feature allows you to assign any software control or parameter to an external controller with a simple click on the parameter’s knob
- New, integrated 4-track recorder/player allows you to capture and layer your ideas quickly and easily - right at the moment of inspiration!
AmpliTube 3 is now shipping as VST, RTAS and Audio Unit plug-in formats, and also as stand-alone software for Mac OSX and Windows, currently available in the following versions and MSRP prices:

• AmpliTube 3 $349.99/€269.99
• AmpliTube 3 Crossgrade $269.99/€199.99 (available to any IK registered user)
• AmpliTube 3 Upgrade $199.99/€149.99 (available to all previous AmpliTube 2, AmpliTube Metal, AmpliTube Jimi Hendrix, AmpliTube Fender or Ampeg SVX registered users)
• AmpliTube 3 Pedal $399.99/€299.99 (AmpliTube 3 bundled with StealthPedal USB/MIDI controller and audio interface)

For more information:
Amplitube

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