A delay, reverb, and looper pedal with 24 presets and up to two seconds of delay time.

Shenzhen, China (January 10, 2017) -- Designed and developed over a year, in collaboration with Devin Townsend, the Ocean Machine is a high fidelity professional delay, reverb, and looper unit which brings together the best available hardware on the market and very complex algorithms to create lush, heavenly effects. Mooer has worked very closely with Devin Townsend to meet all of his own personal requirements while also ensuring that the Ocean Machine is versatile and enjoyable for musicians from all walks of life.

A multitude of programmability and control options makes the ocean machine ideal for all different kinds of guitarists from bedroom beginners to industry professionals and is easy to integrate into all different kind of setups. Mooer has brought all of this together into a small, stylish and highly competitive, cost efficient package.

Some of the key features:

  • Two independent delays with 17 different delay types, up to two seconds of delay time, tap tempo, sub division, and optional ping-pong effect
  • A high fidelity spacious reverb with nine different reverb types and shimmer effect
  • An audio looper with 32 MB of storage memory providing a total of up to 60 seconds of recording time and half speed/reverse effects
  • All basic delay and reverb parameters can be adjusted via dedicated control knobs for fast and easy adjustment on the fly and programmable order of effects chain
  • 8 banks with 3 presets on each, providing a total of 24 preset spaces

The Ocean Machine will be available from official Mooer dealers and distributors worldwide at the bargain retail price of $299 - $350 USD.

Watch the company's video demo:

For more information:
Mooer

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