Pigtronix introduces the Bass Envelope Phaser, Philosopher Bass Compressor and Bass FAT Drive pedals for Winter NAMM 2013.

Port Jefferson Station, NY (January 15, 2013) -- Pigtronix introduces the Bass Envelope Phaser, Philosopher Bass Compressor and Bass FAT Drive pedals for Winter NAMM 2013.

Building on the breakout success of its line of futuristic analog pedals, Pigtronix is proud to announce the launch of three new pedals, specifically designed for bass players. While much of the Pigtronix product line has been embraced by bass luminaries such as Bakithi Kumalo, Billy Sheehan and Norwood Fisher, these new bass pedals have been fine-tuned using rock star input and years of customer feedback to provide a streamlined solution for bassists at all levels.

The all new Bass Envelope Phaser features a straight ahead, no-nonsense design that is guaranteed to blow up the dance floor with its earth shaking low end and unique, vowel like articulation. Included in this new design is the Pigtronix staccato envelope circuit, which auto closes the envelope between notes, for un-matched performance with high speed finger techniques and slap bass.

Pigtronix Philosopher Bass Compressor brings the heralded Philosopher's Tone compressor circuit to bassists with infinite clean sustain, a blend knob for preserving natural string attack via parallel compression and a harmonic distortion tuned especially for low frequency domination. Never before has so much bass friendly compression been squeezed into such a small package.

The Bass Fat Drive leverages Pigtronix CMOS clipping concept to sculpt a larger than life sound that breaks up based on how hard you hit the strings. The Bass FAT Drive provides an extra wide range of touch sensitive gain courtesy of its "MORE" switch and sports a bass specific low pass filter for total transparency and robust bottom.

Packing enormous low end wallop into a tiny footprint at an affordable price, the new Pigtronix Bass pedals are handmade in Long Island, USA. Come experience them for yourself at NAMM Booth 5218 in Hall B.

For more information:
Pigtronix

Rig Rundown: Adam Shoenfeld

Whether in the studio or on his solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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