PreSonus Announces Eris-Series Studio Monitors

PreSonus announces its new Eris-series studio reference monitors. These 2-way, bi-amped monitor speakers deliver very accurate response with a tight bass and very clear upper end.

Baton Rouge, LA (March 7, 2013) -- PreSonus today unveiled its new Eris-series studio reference monitors. These ultra-affordable, 2-way, bi-amped monitor speakers deliver very accurate response with a tight bass and very clear upper end. They can also be user-adjusted to the acoustic space, allowing you to create a more accurate listening environment or to simulate different common listening environments - a feature not typically provided by studio monitors in this price point.

The Eris E8 features an 8-inch, Kevlar low-frequency transducer, driven by a 70 watt, Class AB power amplifier; and a 1.25-inch (32 mm), silk-dome, high-frequency tweeter with a 60W, Class AB amplifier. It can deliver up to 105 dB SPL, peak. Frequency response is rated at 45 Hz to 22 kHz.

The compact Eris E5 sports a 5.25-inch, Kevlar low-frequency driver, mated with a 40W, Class AB amplifier; and a 1-inch (25 mm), silk-dome tweeter powered by a 30W, Class AB amplifier. It can crank out a clean 102 dB SPL, peak. Frequency response is rated at 64 Hz to 22 kHz.

Both Eris models have individual balanced XLR and ¼" TRS input connections in addition to unbalanced RCA inputs. Both offer RF shielding, current-output limiting, over-temperature protection, and subsonic protection.

Users also can make several types of custom adjustments. A four-position Acoustic Space switch controls a second-order shelving filter, centered at 800 Hz, that provides three attenuation points (no attenuation, -2 dB, and -4 dB), allowing you to control the bass response relative to the wall proximity of your speakers. A High Pass switch sets the low-frequency cutoff (second-order slope, -12 dB/octave) to be flat, 80 Hz, or 100 Hz. You also get continuously adjustable High Frequency and Midrange controls from -6 dB to +6 dB.

This combination of controls lets you create a linear response for accurate monitoring. It also enables you to simulate different listening environments, so you don't have to listen to mixes on your car, consumer computer speakers, and home stereo to check how the music sounds with different systems. Instead, you can adjust the Eris monitors' response and test your mixes without leaving your studio. No other monitors in this price class offer this degree of control.

The Eris E8 and E5 are expected to be available in April 2013. Anticipated MSRP/MAP prices: E8 $629/$499 and E5 $399/$299.

For more information:
PreSonus

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