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To All the Amps I’ve Loved Before

Willie Nelson
Original Willie Nelson Photo by Larry Philpot

To celebrate PG's upcoming annual Amp Issue, our editorial director lays waste to Willie Nelson and Julio Iglesias' 1984 hit.

To all the amps I've loved before
Who travelled in and out my door
I'm glad they came along
I dedicate this ridiculous "content"
To all the boom boxes I've blasted before


To all the amps whose tubes I once abused
And may I say I've blasted the best
For helping me to blow
My pant legs down below
As I strive to block grille stains I'm loathe to show

The winds of change are always blowing
And every time I try to stay
The winds of stupid gear lust continue to gust
And carry my funds away

To all the Tolex-covered tarts who've shared my life
Who now are someone else's prize
I'm glad they came along
I dedicate this admittedly full-on dad-joke column
To all the boom boxes I've loved before

To all the amps who blared for me
Who filled my jams with ecstasy … or at least an excuse to play shittily
They live within my heart
I'll always be a part
Of all the amps I've loved before

The winds of change are always blowing
And every time I try to stay
The winds of foolish gear lust continue blowing
And carry my money away

To all the boom boxes we've loved before
Who banged the fuck out of drywall near our doors
We're glad they came along
We dedicate this song
To all the amps we've stupidly sold before

To all the amps we've loved before
Who nearly toppled us down steps and splattered us on the floor
We're glad they came along
We dedicate this silly screed
To all the amps we've loved before

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