Roland Releases the Blues Cube Hot Amp

The Blues Cube Hot features Roland’s acclaimed Tube Logic design which provides authentic tube tone and touch response.

Anaheim, California (January 21, 2016) -- Roland announces the Blues Cube Hot, the latest addition to the respected Blues Cube guitar amplifier series. Equipped with 30 Watts of power and a custom 12-inch speaker, this compact combo is ideal for home or studio use, yet still delivers plenty of volume for stage performing. The Blues Cube Hot features Roland’s acclaimed Tube Logic design, which provides authentic tube tone and touch response with modern advantages like lighter weight and maintenance-free operation.

Going far beyond modeling, Roland’s Tube Logic approach starts by carefully reproducing the inner workings of the revered tweed-era tube amp in every way, including preamp and output tube distortion characteristics, power supply compression, speaker interaction, and much more. Great feel, distortion control with touch and volume, bloom, sparkle, power supply “sag,” and more—everything that players love about a dialed-in, vintage tube amp is present in abundance with the Blues Cube.

While the Blues Cube Hot is the smallest amp in the line, it still packs a big punch. A custom 12-inch speaker delivers a rich, full voice that’s enhanced with the amp’s classic open-back cabinet design and poplar construction. The single-channel configuration offers easy and intuitive operation, with a wide range of sounds accessible from a single knob. Everything from warm clean tones to full-throttle overdrive can be dialed in, and Boost and Tone switches provide further tone-shaping options. Additional controls include a three-band EQ, master volume and onboard reverb.

With Tube Logic, the Blues Cube Hot produces the complex output distortion characteristics of a tube amp when the volume is turned up. The Blues Cube’s variable Power Control provides settings of 0.5 W, 5 W, 15 W, and Max, allowing users to enjoy this musical, cranked-up tone while matching the volume to any situation, from recording to rehearsals to nightclub gigs.

Footswitch jacks are provided for remote control of the Boost and Tone functions. The amp also features USB connectivity, making it simple for players to capture record-ready tones directly into their favorite computer recording applications.

For more information:
Roland

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