10 pedalboard options that’ll help you protect your loved ones and keep things tidy at your feet.

So you have a killer pedal collection, but lack organizational skills. Or maybe you’re new to the wonderful world of effects and need a blank slate on which to start. Regardless, a dependable and efficient pedalboard is a must for any tone shaper, and we’ve rounded up a collection of options to help you get started in finding what’s right for you.

These aluminum pedalboards with a modified rail design are built with players in mind who use true-bypass switchers or want an extra rail to better accommodate a wide range of configurations. The heavy-duty tour case will help keep your pedals safe on the road. Inspired by skateboard decks and the desire to ditch Velcro, these pedalboards are constructed of 12-ply Baltic birch, hold six to 10 pedals and a power supply with ease, and use zip-ties to securely latch down stompboxes. The two-tiered design of this strong and lightweight aluminum pedalboard provides easy access for up to 20 effects devices, and the unique porting, power-supply bracket, and included Velcro allows for a clean, sturdy set up. The ’board comes with a padded gig bag. Constructed of durable molded plastic, this pedalboard includes a built-in AC adapter that can power up to seven pedals. It’s lightweight for easy transport and there is ample room for customized setups. These hand-assembled pedalboards feature 1/2" Eastern plywood construction that’s wrapped with a durable polyweave skin. The Gigman offers dense-foam interior padding and is finished with high-quality catches, hinges, and corner strengtheners. This rigid arched-shape polyethylene pedalboard has a pair of larger surface areas for wah- and volume-type pedals and can accommodate up to 10 stompboxes. A 9V daisy chain power supply and a heavy-duty lightweight carry case are included. This budget-friendly pedalboard with included gig bag boasts room for 10 standard-size effects, is angled for comfortable foot access, has cutouts for power distribution and cable management, and also includes hook-and-loop strips for custom organization. The patented modular design of this ’board allows players to stair-step their effects between two levels or raise the panels on the first tier to accommodate larger pedals. Dual input jacks, two output jacks, and a dual inlet/outlet AC socket are mounted externally. This no-nonsense pedalboard features a rugged textured-vinyl exterior atop a wood frame, heavy-duty metal latches and corners, back- and bottom-side feet, soft interior padding, and a thickly padded carry handle. This handcrafted zebra-wood ’board is constructed using dovetail joinery and is decked out with such options as a recessed IEC power-in socket with on/off switch, a quartet of 1/4" Switchcraft plugs, and a multi-slot “Plus” top. Other pedalboards start at $95.

Standard MKII

HOLEYBOARD
$99

ToneTrunk 70

T-REX ENGINEERING
$149

BCB-60

BOSS
$169

G-Mega-Bone

GATOR CASES
$129

GPB3000

ON-STAGE
$75

MPS-XL III C NP

PEDAL PAD
$399

Heritage Series 24x16

CREATION MUSIC COMPANY
$347

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Deep into Taj Mahal and Ry Cooder’s Get on Board: The Songs of Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee, percussionist Joachim Cooder lays out, letting the two elder musicians can take a pass through “Pawn Shop Blues.” To start, they loosely play around with the song’s intro on their acoustic guitars. “Yeah, nice,” remarks Mahal off-handedly in his distinctive rasp—present since he was a young man but, at 79, he’s aged into it—and Cooder lightly chuckles. They hit the turnaround and settle into a slow, loping tempo. It’s a casual and informal affair—some notes buzz, and it sounds like one of them is stomping his foot intermittently. Except for Cooder’s slide choruses, neither guitar plays a rhythm or lead role. They simply converse.

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I have a love-hate relationship with acoustic guitars. My infatuation with the 6-string really blasted off with the Ventures. That’s the sound I wanted, and the way to get it was powered by electricity. Before I’d even held a guitar, I knew I wanted a Mosrite, which I was sure was made of fiberglass like the surfboards the Beach Boys, Surfaris, and the Challengers rode in their off time. Bristling with space-age switchgear and chrome-plated hardware, those solidbody hotrod guitars were the fighter jets of my musical dreams. I didn’t even know what those old-timey round-hole guitars were called. As the singing cowboys Roy Rogers and Gene Autrey strummed off into the sunset, the pace of technology pushed the look and sound of the electric guitar (and bass) into the limelight and into my heart. Imagine my disappointment when I had to begin my guitar tutelage on a rented Gibson “student” acoustic. At least it sort of looked like the ones the Beatles occasionally played. Even so, I couldn’t wait to trade it in.

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We live in the golden age of boutique pedals that are loaded with advanced features—many of which were nearly unthinkable a decade or so ago. But there’s something that will always be valuable about a rock-solid dirt box that won’t break your wallet. Here’s a collection of old classics and newly designed stomps that cost less than an average concert ticket.

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