Premier Guitar features affiliate links to help support our content. We may earn a commission on any affiliated purchases.

First Look: EarthQuaker Devices Zoar Dynamic Audio Grinder Distortion

First Look: EarthQuaker Devices Zoar Dynamic Audio Grinder Distortion
EarthQuaker Devices Zoar Dynamic Audio Grinder Distortion Demo | First Look

Discreet circuitry and a flexible EQ mean mainline thrills and malleable tones in the latest drive from Akron’s finest.


Zoar has been designed to create a customizable hi-fi and modern-sounding distortion, but with the ghosts of old-school circuitry to deliver a grind that is both familiar and delightfully unique.

From defined sparkle and tightness of an overdrive to low-medium gain fuzz that’s perfect for drop-tuned guitars and basses, Zoar is designed to do it all. Zoar lets you dial in and control every nuance of your tone from jangly on-the-verge of break up to blowing the walls out heavy saturation.

While having its roots in a very familiar past, the passive 3-band EQ has been finely tuned for modern tones. While this style of tone shaping seems simple on the surface, it is deceptively complex and highly interactive - yet surprisingly easy to instantly dial in dozens of mind-blowing sounds.

Learn more here.

Alex LIfeson, Victor

Anthem Records in Canada and Rhino Records will reissue the first-ever solo albums of Rush's Alex Lifeson and Geddy Lee. Lifeson’s 1996 album Victor and Lee’s 2000 offering My Favourite Headache will be re-released on August 9, 2024.

Read MoreShow less

The "Sandblasted" SE Series features a swamp ash top with a unique sandblasted finish in five color options.

Read MoreShow less

We’re unpacking Reid’s playing—from his early days in the NYC jazz underground through his work with Living Colour and into supergroup superstardom—and his longstanding gear-acquisition-syndrome.

Read MoreShow less
Fall Out Boy Rig Rundown [2024]
Fall Out Boy Rig Rundown with Patrick Stump, Joe Trohman & Pete Wentz Guitar & Bass Gear Tour

The string-section trio for the iconic Chicago pop-punk band has gone digital, but Patrick Stump, Joe Trohman, and Pete Wentz still aren’t afraid to get weird—and sometimes, downright dangerous.

Read MoreShow less