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Top 10 Hooked Videos of 2021

Paul Gilbert on Zep, Samantha Fish on Tom Petty, Marty Friedman on Sabbath, and more players share stories of how and when the guitar rocked their worlds.


10. Destroy Boys' Violet Mayugba on Fugazi's "Furniture"

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How a fateful ride to school opened this riot grrrl punker's eyes to a life beyond the power chord.


9. Sammy Boller on Ozzy Osbourne's "Crazy Train"

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The instrumental phenom "blames" Randy Rhoads' pyrotechnics and the iconic music video for sparking his move to electric guitar.

8. Alex Skolnick on Van Halen's "I'm the One"

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Testament's shredder recollects how EVH's swinging, sneering ripper redirected him down the path of a hard-rock lead guitarist.


7. Imogen Clark on Led Zeppelin's "Over the Hills and Far Away"

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The Aussie indie rocker connects how being raised on a healthy diet of Zep—including her father performing in a cover band—influenced her to combine gentle folk stylings with the need to rock.


6. Fat Mike on RKL's "Blocked Out"

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NOFX 's comedic leader and low-end anchor recalls the ripping bass line that motivated him to be a better player.


5. Myles Kennedy on Led Zeppelin's "Whole Lotta Love"

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Find out why Jimmy Page's playing saved the Alter Bridge frontman and Slash collaborator from a life of selling shoes like Al Bundy.


4. My Chemical Romance's Frank Iero on Black Flag's "Rise Above"

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The MCR rocker remembers being sucked into Greg Ginn's diagonal riffs from a friend's mixtape and retells creeping out the punk-rock legend.


3. Samantha Fish on Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers' "American Girl"

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The blues-rock star revisits the American storyteller's song that spoke to her as budding songwriter and showed her the magic of layering and mixing memorable guitar parts.


2. Marty Friedman on Black Sabbath's "Into the Void"

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The former Megadeth lead guitarist and shredmeister remembers being dumbstruck by Tony Iommi's imposing sound.


1. Paul Gilbert on Led Zeppelin's "Heartbreaker"

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The Mr. Big shred hero vividly recalls "the best day of his guitar existence" and illustrates how the whole body needs to work in unison to match Pagey's vibrato.


Need big tones in a small setup? Here’s a collection of lunchbox-sized amps that pack a punch.

Not every gig requires a pair of 4x12 cabs and a 100-watt head. (Sadly.) We’ve rounded up a handful of lunchbox-sized heads that can deliver crystal-clean tones, dirty crunch, and ripping lead tones—all in a very portable package.

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On this season finale episode, the actor and musician leads a Prine-inspired songwriting session about how few tools we have in our collective toolbox.

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John Mayall in the late ’80s, in a promo shot for his Island Records years. During his carreer, he also recorded for the Decca (with the early Bluesbreakers lineups), Polydor, ABC, DJM, Silvertone, Eagle, and Forty Below labels.

He was dubbed “the father of British blues,” but Mayall’s influence was worldwide, and he nurtured some of the finest guitarists in the genre, including Eric Clapton, Peter Green, Mick Taylor, Harvey Mandel, Coco Montoya, and Walter Trout. Mayall died at his California home on Monday, at age 90.

John Mayall’s career spanned nearly 70 years, but it only took his first four albums to cement his legendary status. With his initial releases with his band the Bluesbreakers—1966’s Blues Breakers with Eric Clapton; ’67’s A Hard Road, with Peter Green on guitar; plus the same year’s Crusade, which showcased Mick Taylor—and his solo debut The Blues Alone, also from 1967, Mayall introduced an international audience of young white fans to the decidedly Black and decidedly American genre called blues. In the subsequent decades, he maintained an active touring and recording schedule until March 26, 2022, when he played his last gig at age 87. It was reported that he died peacefully, on Monday, in his California home, at 90.

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Donner andThird Man Hardware’s $99, three-in-one analog distortion, phaser, and delay honors Jack White’s budget gear roots.

Compact. Light. Fun. Dirt cheap. Many cool sounds that make this pedal a viable option for traveling pros.

Phaser level control not much use below 1 o’clock. Repeats are bright for an analog delay. Greater range of low-gain sounds would be nice.

$99

Donner X Third Man Triple Threat
thirdmanrecords.com

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A huge part of the early White Stripes mystique, sound, ethos, and identity was tied to guitars and amps that, at the time, you could luck into for cheap at a garage sale. These days, it’s harder to score a Crestwood Astral II, or Silvertone Twin Twelve with a part-time job in the ice cream shop. Back in the late ’90s, though, they were a source of raw, nasty sounds for less than a new, more generic guitar or amp.

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