Godin Session R HT Pro & Derry Grehan Signature Tread 1 Demos | NAMM 2022

The company celebrates their 50th anniversary with a signature model from a Canadian rock legend and a powerhouse HSS-loaded double cutaway.


Session R-HT Pro

At first glance — with its reversed headstock, fixed bridge, and iconic PAF Humbucker — you might assume that the Godin Session R-HT PRO is only suited for flat-out rock or metal! However, at Godin, we are passionate about designing versatile guitars that can produce the sounds that fit a player’s musical style in the moment!

To achieve this in the Session R-HT PRO, we chose the Custom Custom Seymour Duncan SH-11 pickup for the bridge, and two Lace Sensor Hot Gold pickups for the middle and neck. The combination of these three excellent “made-in-the-USA” pickups, together with a 5-way switch, volume and tone, gives this guitar a massive tonal range. Do you need a powerful, warm distortion but also a bright, open sound for arpeggio playing? The Godin Session R-HT PRO can take on either of these sounds with ease! In fact, you can play this guitar in all situations and musical styles, whether in the studio or on stage.

Made entirely in Canada, the Godin Session R-HT PRO features a basswood body and hard maple neck with a rosewood fingerboard. Our “acoustically tuned” matte finish and the use of a fixed bridge with through holes allows the strings to vibrate more freely, improving both the sustain and natural resonance of the guitar. To top it all off, the headstock features our “vintage” Godin logo.

The Godin Session R-HT PRO — a guitar that absolutely “rocks”… but not only!

Godin Guitars
$1440


Name: John Nania
Hometown: Omaha, Nebraska
Bass: Blade Runner Bass

The emerging parts market in the ’80s, a luthier friend, and a cousin who studied acoustic engineering helped this bassist create a one-of-a-kind instrument.

Thank you for allowing us to share our bastardized beauties with you. I built this bass with the help of my friend Drew in 1980 or ’81. It was an instrument born out of necessity. Stock instruments of the time weren’t keeping up with the musical progressions that were happening in the ’70s and ’80s, so if you wanted to advance your art, you had to get creative. Fortunately, parts manufacturers and inventive minds were there to accommodate.
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See a sampling of picks used by famous guitarists over the years.

Marty Stuart

Submit your own artist pick collections to rebecca@premierguitar.com for inclusion in a future gallery.

My years-long search for the “right” Bigsby-outfitted box finally paid off. Now how do I make this sumbitch work in my band?

Considering the amount of time I’ve spent (here and elsewhere) talking about and lusting after Gretsch hollowbody guitars, it’s taken me a remarkably long time to end up with a big Bigsby-outfitted box I truly love. High-end Gretsches are pricey enough that, for a long time, I just couldn’t swing it. Years ago I had an Electromatic for a while, and it looked and played lovely, but didn’t have the open, blooming acoustic resonance I hoped for. A while later, I reviewed the stellar Players Edition Broadkaster semi-hollow, and it was so great in so many ways that I set my sights on it, eventually got one, and adore it to this day. Yet the full-hollowbody lust remained.

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