A wealth of new options aimed at the internet age are packed into these powerful combos.


Blackstar Amplification ID Core V3

Whether a beginner or a pro when you play we want you to have the best possible playing experience. That’s why the same R&D team responsible for our professional amps also designed the ID:Core V3. Unique innovations and connectivity give guitarists the best possible sound from the first time they plug in.

Incredible tone and immersive Super Wide Stereo sound will inspire your playing. Guitarist-friendly controls combine with the power of programmability for an amazingly versatile tonal range from pristine clean to high gain. Live streaming to your smartphone is easy using a common TRRS cable and built-in USB connectivity allows you to easily record directly to your computer. Our free Architect software gives you access to our state-of-the-art Cab Rig Lite advanced cabinet simulator, along with deep editing and patch management.

Facebook
Instagram
Youtube
Buy it

Be sure to check out more demos in this year's Winter Gear Slam

How jangle, glam, punk, shoegaze, and more blended to create a worldwide phenomenon. Just don’t forget your tambourine.

Intermediate

Beginner

  • Learn genre-defining elements of Britpop guitar.
  • Use the various elements to create your own Britpop songs.
  • Discover how “borrowing” from the best can enrich your own playing.
{u'media': u'[rebelmouse-document-pdf 12854 site_id=20368559 original_filename="Britpop-Dec21.pdf"]', u'file_original_url': u'https://roar-assets-auto.rbl.ms/documents/12854/Britpop-Dec21.pdf', u'type': u'pdf', u'id': 12854, u'media_html': u'Britpop-Dec21.pdf'}

When considering the many bands that fall under the term “Britpop”–Oasis, Blur, Suede, Elastica, Radiohead’s early work, and more–it’s clear that the genre is more an attitude than a specific musical style. Still, there are a few guitar techniques and approaches that abound in the genre, many of which have been “borrowed” (the British music press’ friendly way of saying “appropriated”) from earlier British bands of the 1960s, ’70s, and ’80s.

Read More Show less

"'If I fall and somehow my career ends on that particular day, then so be it," Joe Bonamassa says of his new hobby, bicycling. "If it's over, it's over. You've got to enjoy your life."

Photo by Steve Trager

For his stylistically diverse new album, the fiery guitar hero steps back from his gear obsession and focuses on a deep pool of influences and styles.

Twenty years ago, Joe Bonamassa was a struggling musician living in New York City. He survived on a diet of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and ramen noodles that he procured from the corner bodega at Columbus Avenue and 83rd Street. Like many dreamers waiting for their day in the sun, Joe also played "Win for Life" every week. It was, in his words, "literally my ticket out of this hideous business." While the lottery tickets never brought in the millions, Joe's smokin' guitar playing on a quartet of albums from 2002 to 2006—So, It's Like That, Blues Deluxe, Had to Cry Today, and You & Me—did get the win, transforming Joe into a guitar megastar.

Read More Show less
x