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Cort Unveils the Gold A6

Cort Unveils the Gold A6

The company uses its Aged to Vintage (ATV) treatment to allow the Gold A6’s solid sitka spruce top to cure and open up more over time.

Seoul, South Korea (October 30, 2017) -- Less than a year after launching its Gold Series with Dreadnought and Orchestra-Model styles, Cort Guitars proudly introduces the Cort Gold A6 with a Grand Auditorium body. The Gold A6 is the new ‘middle child’ in size with the sonic character and meticulous details that have come to define the Gold Series, Cort’s best-ever acoustic guitar family.

The Gold A6 delivers a full-bodied, well-balanced tone that suits virtually any musical style and taste. One of the advantages of the Grand Auditorium body is its 45mm genuine bone nut and saddle, ideal for fingerstyle playing. Cort’s premium materials are showcased in softer melodies. The only way to electronically compliment the high-quality craftmanship of the guitar was to integrate the Fishman Flex Blend System. This system combines an under-saddle pickup with a condenser mic to provide even the most demanding acoustic players the tones they desire. On any stage. At any level. The preamp superbly translates the guitar’s natural sound.

Achieving decades-old character, Cort uses its Aged to Vintage (ATV) treatment to allow the Gold A6’s solid sitka spruce top to cure and open up more over time. ATV acts as a torrefaction process, giving this guitar a big, open tone that’s bright, yet natural with a strong and warm midrange that’s brought out by the all-solid mahogany construction on the back and sides. The sonically enhanced UV finish, Natural Glossy, protects both the instrument and tonal quality.

Cort’s craftsmen have modernized the X-bracing by hand-scalloping it to lighten the weight and to free up added top vibration. They also chose a tight-fitting traditional dovetail neck joint reinforced with a bolt, creating a DoubleLock neck that maximizes the transfer of tone and enhances resonance. The Gold A6’s mahogany neck is reinforced with walnut for added stability. The Macassar Ebony fretboard matches the material choice for the bridge with ebony pins. Nodding to the ‘Gold’ moniker, Deluxe Vintage Gold Tuners accent the headstock.

The Gold A6 retails for $1,049.99 (MAP: $699.99) and comes with an exclusive deluxe soft-side case. Learn more about the Gold series on Cort’s website.

For more information:
Cort Guitars

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