The new strings use compound winding in order to add more layers to the string.

Glendale, AZ (October 4, 2017) -- In the physics of music, the greatest moments are often achieved after a moment of tension. Dean Markley has applied this basic principle to its renewed, intelligently designed SR2000 bass strings. Offering the perfect mix of mass, tension and other engineering marvels, these strings provide a big, meaty bass tone and a revved-up performance that feels like a smooth-running machine. Whether they’re thumped, slapped, picked, or caressed, SR2000 bass strings return the love with tone, resonance and unwavering sustain.

Innovation begins with technology, and Dean Markley has taken its own unique approach to the manufacturing of SR2000 bass strings. Every maker has their own recipe and here it is no different. It all starts with the core wire. The first thing that sets a Dean Markley string apart from any other manufacturer is the tension in which that core wire is held during the winding process. The second thing that sets these strings apart is the compound winding. With the exception of strings smaller than .050, all of the Dean Markley bass strings are made with compound winding in smaller incremental sizes of premium-quality wire. The winding directions are reversed between layers to cross-hatch the covers, making the string smoother.

Using smaller incremental wire for the wraps allows Dean Markley to use more layers. More layers mean more mass. Dean Markley uses three covers at thicker gauges like .095 and four covers at .120—many other manufacturers simply use thicker wire and get away with less wraps. The core wire dictates the playability of the string. The way a string is wound will dictate how long it lasts – and how it sustains, the smaller wire wrap gauges improve the mass and feel. The only other element involved is the quality of the material and here there are no compromises.

Each material used has a specific weight that influences tension, so Dean Markley uses mathematical modeling to determine the right mix of core to wrap. Strings can break when core-to-cover ratio is too small, but when it’s too large, playability is sacrificed. It’s a very fine balance. Dean Markley has achieved the ideal balance for SR2000 Bass strings.

Although players probably won’t be focusing on the many technical wonders of SR2000 bass strings, they’ll be fully in tune with the wondrous effect these strings can have on their playing technique. Featuring new artwork on environmentally friendly packaging, SR2000 Bass strings are bound—and also wound—to make a statement unlike any strings currently on the market. Grab a set in Light (L), Medium Light (ML), Medium Custom (MC) or Medium (MED) gauges for 4-string, 5-string, or 6-string bass, and in MC for 7-string bass.

List Price Starts at $24.99

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