A natural overdrive and clean boost designed for bassists.

New York, NY (January 5, 2015) -- Electro-Harmonix introduces the Bass Soul Food, a natural overdrive and clean boost designed for the tone conscious player who wants to enhance the original sound of his or her instrument and amp while retaining their essential character.

The compact pedal features a gain stage, treble control and signal path optimized for bass guitar and guitarists demanding more low-end definition. An adjustable clean blend assures an articulate full tone while boosted power rails deliver extended headroom.

EHX Founder and President, Mike Matthews, stated: “Our Soul Food put Klon-like transparent overdrive into the hands of players at an unprecedented price point. Now we want to bring that to bass guitarists and guitar players who want more low-end punch. The Bass Soul Food delivers a wide range of overdrive and clean boost sounds, and has plenty of volume to assert your place in the mix. It will give your tone a lift in all the right places!”

The pedal also features selectable true or buffered bypass modes and a switchable -10dB pad for active instruments. It runs on 9V battery and ships with an EHX9.6DC-200 power supply. The Bass Soul Food has a U.S. List Price of $117.79.

Watch the company's video demo:

For more information:
Electro-Harmonix

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