The MOSFET-based OD Glove goes after British EL34 sounds and is housed in a compact die-cast package.

New York, NY (October 14, 2013) -- With the new OD Glove, Electro-Harmonix expands its range of classic and modern overdrive, distortion and fuzz pedals. The MOSFET based OD Glove possesses a tone that feels and sounds as organic as a venerable EL34-powered British amplifier. It delivers a rich, overtone laden sound that never gets muddy, even with darker settings, plus high touch-sensitivity and an expanded harmonic range.

EHX Founder and President, Mike Matthews, stated: “The OD Glove is unlike any of the overdrives we offer and great!”

Advanced features include a Tone Shift switch, selectable 9 or 18V internal voltage and True Bypass switching. Tone Shift controls the mid frequency emphasis of the tone circuit and allows precise tone sculpting. The internal voltage switch changes the pedal’s internal power supply voltage. Operation at 9V results in a tighter sound, and reduces the current draw. Operation at 18V results in a less compressed, more open tone. True bypass preserves signal integrity when the effect is not engaged.

The control layout also includes Volume, Tone and Gain knobs. Volume sets the output level of the pedal and, along with lower Gain settings, can be used to dial in a sweet clean boost. Gain controls the amount of distortion, taking the OD Glove from a natural, smooth overdrive to thick, saturated high-gain sounds. The Tone control helps tame the treble to tailor the tone.

The new OD Glove pedal is housed in a compact die-cast package, equipped with a 9-volt battery, can be powered by an optional standard 9.6-Volt/DC200mA AC adapter and carries a U.S. list price of $77.38.

Watch the company's video demo:

For more information:
Electro-Harmonix

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We’re almost finished with the aging process on our project guitar. Let’s work on the fretboard, nut, and truss rod cover, and prepare the headstock for the last hurrah.

Hello and welcome back to Mod Garage. This month we’ll continue with our relic’ing project, taking a closer look at the front side of the neck and treating the fretboard and the headstock. We’ll work on the front side of the headstock in the next part, but first we must prepare it.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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