EHX expands their Next Step line with the Slammi, a pitch-shifter/harmony pedal that contains a new algorithm that covers up to three octaves above the note and includes a Detune function.

Long Island City, NY (October 25, 2013) -- The new Slammi Pitch-Shifter/Harmony pedal combines a powerful new algorithm with EHX’s revolutionary Next Step Effects platform to deliver superior tone, glitch free operation and precision control.

The Slammi’s MAX BEND control functions as an 11-position switch. It allows the player to set the pedal’s maximum bend/interval to Detune for a lush chorus effect as well as 1/2 Step, Major 2nd, Major 3rd, Perfect 4th, Perfect 5th, Major 6th, Minor 7th, 1 Octave, 2 Octaves and 3 Octaves. Bends can move up or down in relation to the original pitch, selectable with the pedal’s Bend button. Maximum bend can be achieved in either the toe-down or heel-down position, allowing the player to customize the pedal’s response to their playing preference. The Slammi’s controls also include a thumb wheel for Dry Volume which blends in the instrument’s dry signal.

EHX’s Next Step Effects series benefit from a design with no moving parts to wear out or break plus lightning-fast response, high sensitivity and silent bypassing with no clunky button to engage.

The new Slammi Polyphonic Pitch-Shifter/Harmony Pedal is housed in a rugged die-cast chassis and comes equipped with a 9-volt battery. It can also be powered by an optional standard 9.6-Volt/DC200mA AC adapter and carries a U.S. list price of $191.66.

Watch the company's video demo:

For more information:
Electro-Harmonix

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We’re almost finished with the aging process on our project guitar. Let’s work on the fretboard, nut, and truss rod cover, and prepare the headstock for the last hurrah.

Hello and welcome back to Mod Garage. This month we’ll continue with our relic’ing project, taking a closer look at the front side of the neck and treating the fretboard and the headstock. We’ll work on the front side of the headstock in the next part, but first we must prepare it.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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