Epiphone Releases the Jeff Waters Annihilation-II Flying V

The new guitar features a custom Annihilation Red gloss finish designed by Jeff and is powered by Epiphone ProBucker humbucker pickups.

Nashville, TN (November 11, 2015) -- Epiphone, the world’s #1 choice for professional, affordable instruments, presents the new Jeff Waters Annihilation-II Flying-V Outfit –Jeff’s second signature model with Epiphone. The new guitar features a custom Annihilation Red gloss color finish designed by Jeff and is powered by critically acclaimed Epiphone ProBucker humbucker pickups. The new Annihilation-II also comes with a custom Phenolic fingerboard, KillPot switch, Grover Rotomatic machine heads and a custom-fitted gig bag.

Jeff Waters is not only revered for his work with the band Annihilator, but also is known around the world for his guitar clinics, which are standing-room-only events attended by pros and pros-at-heart.

“Jeff’s stunning combination of speed and finesse have made him one of the most admired guitarists of his generation,” said Epiphone President Jim Rosenberg, “And all of us here at Epiphone are Jeff’s biggest fans.”

The new Epiphone Jeff Waters Annihilation-II Flying-V Outfit was designed by Jeff with Epiphone’s luthiers at the “House of Stathopoulo” headquarters in Nashville. The Annihilation-II Flying-V Outfit is an updated version of the first Jeff Waters signature Flying-V that set new standards for speed and sound, and has been Jeff’s go-to guitar for hundreds of concerts and clinics around the world.

“The new Annihilation-II Flying-V Outfit is exactly what I envisioned,” says Jeff Waters. “I wanted a guitar that most hard rock and metal players could afford with killer, versatile pickups, a nice finish, and a setup to play either tight heavy rhythms or fast screaming solos I can proudly put my name on!”

For more information:
Epiphone

Photo 1

We’re almost finished with the aging process on our project guitar. Let’s work on the fretboard, nut, and truss rod cover, and prepare the headstock for the last hurrah.

Hello and welcome back to Mod Garage. This month we’ll continue with our relic’ing project, taking a closer look at the front side of the neck and treating the fretboard and the headstock. We’ll work on the front side of the headstock in the next part, but first we must prepare it.

Read More Show less

Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

{u'media': u'[rebelmouse-document-pdf 13574 site_id=20368559 original_filename="7Shred-Jan22.pdf"]', u'file_original_url': u'https://roar-assets-auto.rbl.ms/documents/13574/7Shred-Jan22.pdf', u'type': u'pdf', u'id': 13574, u'media_html': u'7Shred-Jan22.pdf'}
Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
Read More Show less
x