Fender Releases Vintage Modified ’68 Custom Vibrolux Reverb

Both channels boast reverb and tremolo, and the “custom” channel has a modified Bassman tone stack.

Scottsdale, AZ (September 10, 2014) -- Fender is proud to announce the release of the latest Vintage Modified Series amplifiers, the ’68 Custom Vibrolux Reverb amp, following the success of the popular ’68 Custom Twin Reverb, ’68 Custom Deluxe Reverb and ’68 Custom Princeton Reverb amps.

1968 was a transitional year for Fender amps, with tone that was still pure Fender, but a look that was brand new. With a silver-and-turquoise front panel and classy aluminum “drip edge” grille cloth trim, the Vibrolux Reverb received a fresh new face, as it remained the compact, gig-ready amp of choice for pros and amateurs everywhere. The 1968 Vibrolux Reverb featured a unique 2x10 speaker configuration, which delivered snappy twang and big tube tone, while still incorporating world-class Fender reverb and vibrato effects. For countless guitarists ever since, the Vibrolux Reverb has been the go-to amp for classic Fender tone.

The ’68 Custom Vibrolux Reverb Amp pays tribute to the classic look, sound and performance of Fender’s late-’60s “silver-face” amps. In a special twist, both channels boast reverb and tremolo, and the “custom” channel has a modified Bassman tone stack that gives modern players greater tonal flexibility with pedals. The amp also features quicker gain onset and reduced negative feedback for greater touch sensitivity. While fitting a sweet spot between the Deluxe Reverb and Twin Reverb, in respect to power and size, the ’68 Custom Vibrolux Reverb’s dual 10" Celestion TEN 30 configuration and 35 watts of all-tube power deliver distinctive rock ‘n’ roll flavor.

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