Ten of the most intriguing stomp stations from our last year of Rig Rundowns, including Warpaint, Mr. Big, J Mascis, the Fall of Troy, Eric Gales, Silversun Pickups' Nikki Monninger, and Primus' Larry LaLonde.

Dinosaur Jr.'s J Mascis

Dinosaur Jr. frontman J Mascis sported a hefty board way back in our 2012 Rig Rundown shoot, and in our more recent visit with him we found that he continues to rely on a bevy of pedals controlled by a Bob Bradshaw-built Custom Audio Electronics (CAE) switcher. Standout stomps include a combo pedal (bottom right corner-in a new enclosure since our 2012 video) made by Built to Spill's Jim Roth. One side is a clone of a ToneBender MkI, and the other apes a Rangemaster. Mascis also brought along his first Electro-Harmonix "Ram's Head" Big Muff (top right), an EHX Electric Mistress, an MC-FX clone of a Univox Super-Fuzz, a CAE Twin Tremolo (upper left), and a ZVEX Double Rock (two Box of Rocks in one, bottom left). Other differences between our latest and the previous Rig Rundown include a newer Tube Works Real Tube Overdrive, a Moog MF Delay, an Ibanez Analog Delay Mini, and a Boss TU-3S Tuner. An MXR/CAE MC403 Power System and an MXR M238 Iso-Brick supply the juice.

Rig Rundown: Adam Shoenfeld

Whether in the studio or on solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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