The solo guitarist’s tunes and beautifully articulated counterpoint unfold slowly, like flower petals opening to the sunrise.

Ed Gerhard
There and Gone
Virtue Records


Absorbing Ed Gerhard’s music requires patience. For starters, the acoustic fingerstyle wizard took some six years to complete his ninth album, There and Gone. But more importantly, the solo guitarist’s tunes and beautifully articulated counterpoint unfold slowly, like flower petals opening to the sunrise. He doesn’t use flashy tricks to grab your attention, yet if you’re willing to meet Gerhard on his terms, you’ll be rewarded with some of the richest steel-string sounds you’ve ever heard.

Possessing a degree of right-hand control usually associated with classical guitarists, Gerhard can coax a melody to the fore, letting it sing above his lush harmonies and sustaining overtones. He’s partial to open and lowered tunings, and he knows how to use droning bass strings to provide a sonorous foundation for his silvery treble lines.

Gerhard also plays acoustic hollowneck Weissenborn and electric steel, and on several tunes he weaves soaring lap slide into his fingerpicked flattop textures. In addition to Celtic-tinged originals, Gerhard offers intriguing covers, including a dramatic medley of John Lennon‘s “Imagine” and “Across the Universe.” A mysterious and satisfying dance of fingers on strings. —Andy Ellis
Must-hear track: “Imagine”

Intermediate

Beginner

  • Develop a better sense of subdivisions.
  • Understand how to play "over the bar line."
  • Learn to target chord tones in a 12-bar blues.
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Playing in the pocket is the most important thing in music. Just think about how we talk about great music: It's "grooving" or "swinging" or "rocking." Nobody ever says, "I really enjoyed their use of inverted suspended triads," or "their application of large-interval pentatonic sequences was fascinating." So, whether you're playing live or recording, time is everyone's responsibility, and you must develop your ability to play in the pocket.
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