The latest chapter in producer and guitarist Daniel Lanois'' musical journey

Black Dub
Black Dub
Jive



Trip hop, down tempo, dub reggae, gospel, Memphis soul, and early-’60s surf instrumentals collide gloriously in Black Dub, the latest chapter in Daniel Lanois’ amazing musical odyssey. Joined by singer Trixie Whitley—whose plaintive alto recalls her late father, bluesman Chris Whitley—bassist Daryl Johnson, and drummer Brian Blade, Lanois casts a mysterious spell with his pensive fingerpicking and swirling sound effects. Lanois’ solos echo the gritty, Bigsby-drenched fretwork in Neil Young’s After the Gold Rush, and his dreamy double-stops evoke Curtis Mayfield by way of Axis: Bold as Love-era Jimi Hendrix. For Lanois, playing guitar is about generating sonic voodoo, not flaunting technique or athletic ability. By cutting many of their tracks live, Lanois and his Black Dub bandmates imbue their pulsing music with a sense of intimacy and fragile beauty that’s rare in a world of carefully manicured albums.

Magnatone unveils the Starlite, its new 5-watt amplifier with a vintage look designed for the office, backstage, or the studio.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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