This modern-day Delta blues star goes deep on low-powered amps, vintage resos, and open-tuned riffs.

Chris Turpin hung with Premier Guitar’s John Bohlinger before the Ida Mae show at Nashville’s Mercy Lounge, promoting Chasing Lights. Turpin blends resonators, a Gretsch, a funky flattop with low-watt tube amps, and a few modest pedals to build a moody, honest, and raw soundscape.


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The emotional wallop of the acoustic guitar sometimes flies under the radar. Even if you mostly play electric, here are some things to consider about unplugging.

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