GHS Unveils Limited-Edition Infinity Steels Bass Strings

The E and B strings have been made with tapered ends to produce a totally new sound.

Battle Creek, MI (March 23, 2016) -- GHS Strings are delighted to reveal their Limited Edition Infinity Steels coated roundwound electric bass strings, available only while stocks last.

With more people setting out to become bass players and demanding very specific tools for their growing needs, GHS decided to revisit the Infinity Steels bass guitar strings and introduce a limited edition that would appeal to the modern player.

To produce the new Limited Edition Infinity Steels GHS began with the finest raw materials and used a finely-regulated coating process called MST (Metal Surface Treatment). This unique technology coats the outer wires which are then wrapped around a high quality core wire to maximize tone and endurance. The core/cover ratio has been tweaked and the E and B strings have been made with tapered ends to produce a totally new sound creating the perfect homage to the earlier Infinity Steels. They come in the following gauges:

ISB-L5000: 40-58-80-102
ISB-ML5000: 44-63-80-102
ISB-M5000: 44-63-84-106
5ML-ISB: 44-63-80-102-126 (5-String)

The Limited Edition Infinity Strings enable today’s bass guitar player to express their own ideas and individuality while experiencing and discovering the the unique, timeless tone of the first ones. Just like the originals the Limited Edition Infinity Steels are coated in an easily recognizable red and give outstanding, extended performance life.

Bass players looking for a distinctive string that is dynamic and contemporary should check out the Limited Edition Infinity Steels.

For more information:
GHS Strings

Pop Evil’s Nick Fuelling on Why James Hetfield Is “the Man”

Meanwhile, coguitarist Dave Grahs—the band’s resident punk rocker—reveals a surprisingly roots-y side.

See a sampling of picks used by famous guitarists over the years.

Marty Stuart

Submit your own artist pick collections to rebecca@premierguitar.com for inclusion in a future gallery.

Luthier Dave Helmer shows you how to cure buzzy strings, bad intonation, gnarly frets, high action, and other common troubles with off-the-shelf axes.

Guitars are the best. We love them. It’s fun to fall in love with a guitar at a store, buy it, and proudly bring it home. But we’ve all been there … where after a month that new guitar is just not playing as good as it was before. As guitar players, we know what feels good and what feels bad when it comes to playability. Maybe you have setup preferences that you like on all your guitars, or maybe you want to experiment with changes to your setup?

Read MoreShow less
x