GMF Music Announces the AT-1 Acoustic Transducer Pickup

Designed to pick up vibrations from any acoustic soundboard.

West Des Moines, IA (August 5, 2016) -- Adding to the company’s line of acoustic products, GMF unveils the new AT-1 acoustic transducer pickup. The AT-1 is a high quality, easy to use and affordable “stick on” pickup.

Designed to pick up vibrations from any acoustic soundboard be it on a classical guitar, violin, harp, or even a piano. The AT-1 can be used as the sole pickup or to augment built-in pickup systems. All musicians would benefit from having one or more of these stick-on pickups as they your on board system decides to die.

AT-1 highlights include:

  • Instant-mount (no tools required)
  • Crisp and clear tone
  • Great for strumming and delicate fingerstyle playing
  • (2) cable options - studio-quality 10' cable with 1⁄4” plug or 2’ cable with strap pin jack.
  • Works with any guitar amplifier (acoustic or electric), or plugged directly into P.A. systems or mixing consoles

Suggested retail price is $69.00 with an average street price of $39.00.

For more information:
GMF Music

A few simple chords is all it takes.

Beginner

Beginner

  • Learn to play a 12-bar blues, in three different keys, using one shape.
  • Study an assortment of strumming and picking patterns.
  • Gain a basic understanding of the 12-bar blues form.
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As usual, there is more to this lesson than the title implies. We will be working with one chord shape at a time, but over the course of the lesson we’ll study three different shapes. The final example in this lesson incorporates all three shapes to demonstrate how a few basic ideas can provide us with infinite possibilities.

It is important to know that for every chord name in this lesson there are countless shapes—also known as fingerings or voicings—available. For this lesson, I chose what I consider to be the most practical and flexible shapes.

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See a sampling of picks used by famous guitarists over the years.

Marty Stuart

Submit your own artist pick collections to rebecca@premierguitar.com for inclusion in a future gallery.

My years-long search for the “right” Bigsby-outfitted box finally paid off. Now how do I make this sumbitch work in my band?

Considering the amount of time I’ve spent (here and elsewhere) talking about and lusting after Gretsch hollowbody guitars, it’s taken me a remarkably long time to end up with a big Bigsby-outfitted box I truly love. High-end Gretsches are pricey enough that, for a long time, I just couldn’t swing it. Years ago I had an Electromatic for a while, and it looked and played lovely, but didn’t have the open, blooming acoustic resonance I hoped for. A while later, I reviewed the stellar Players Edition Broadkaster semi-hollow, and it was so great in so many ways that I set my sights on it, eventually got one, and adore it to this day. Yet the full-hollowbody lust remained.

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