Gretsch Reintroduces Rancher Acoustic Guitars with 5 New Models

The richly resonant Rancher first appeared in the early 1950s with its triangular sound hole and sweepingly elegant pickguard, and Gretsch is now re-introducing the model.

Gretsch G5022CE Rancher Jumbo Cutaway

Scottsdale, AZ (Jan. 20, 2012) – A great Gretsch name is back with the return of Rancher acoustic guitars. The richly resonant Rancher first appeared in the early 1950s with its triangular sound hole and sweepingly elegant pickguard, and Gretsch is now re-introducing the model. With a great new five-instrument selection of body sizes, styles and features that combine the best of the guitar’s acclaimed past with the best in modern sound, strength, style and playability, Gretsch now gives you the best of all Ranchers.

The G3500 Rancher Folk delivers full, well-articulated acoustic tone worthy of its larger Rancher brothers. Premium features include a vibrant laminated spruce top with scalloped X bracing and the traditional Gretsch Rancher triangular sound hole, laminated mahogany back and sides, mahogany neck with 20-fret rosewood fingerboard, 1940s-style pickguard with Gretsch logo, compensated bridge with rosewood base, nickel-plated hardware, deluxe die-cast tuners and an elegant gloss Natural finish. The G3800 Rancher Orchestra packs those same features into a classic medium-size 21-fret model with a rounded orchestra-style body that fills the hall with full Rancher sound, feel and vibe.

The G5013CE Rancher Jr. is a diminutive but powerful model with an elegant Venetian cutaway for easy access to the fingerboard’s upper reaches and onboard electronics that let it be heard loud and clear. It too has the same features listed above, with the additions of Neo-Classic™ thumbnail inlays on the 21-fret fingerboard and onboard Fishman® electronics that include a Sonicore under-saddle pickup, Isys+ preamp system with onboard tuner, battery life indicator and controls for volume, treble, bass and phase.

The biggest new Rancher is the G5022CE Rancher Jumbo Cutaway Electric, which produces great volume and broadly expansive tone complemented by its elegant Venetian cutaway for easy access to the fingerboard’s upper reaches and onboard electronics. Premium features include a solid spruce top with scalloped X bracing and the traditional Gretsch Rancher triangular sound hole, flame maple back and sides, mahogany neck, 21-fret rosewood fingerboard with Neo-Classic™ thumbnail inlays, 1940s-style pickguard with Gretsch logo, compensated bridge with rosewood base, gold-plated hardware, deluxe die-cast tuners and a gloss Savannah Sunset finish. Onboard Fishman® electronics include a Sonicore under-saddle pickup and Isys+ preamp system with onboard tuner, battery life indicator and controls for volume, treble, bass and phase.

Gretsch G5034 Rancher Dreadnought

The G5034 Rancher Dreadnought delivers full-size, full-on Rancher sound, feel and vibe with classic Gretsch styling. Premium features include a solid spruce top with scalloped X bracing and the traditional Gretsch Rancher triangular sound hole, laminated mahogany back and sides, mahogany neck, 21-fret rosewood fingerboard with Neo-Classic™ thumbnail inlays, 1940s-style pickguard with Gretsch logo, compensated bridge with rosewood base, gold-plated hardware, deluxe die-cast tuners and an elegant gloss Natural finish.

For more information:
www.gretschguitars.com

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Photo by Steve Trager

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Intermediate

Beginner

  • Develop a better sense of subdivisions.
  • Understand how to play "over the bar line."
  • Learn to target chord tones in a 12-bar blues.
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Playing in the pocket is the most important thing in music. Just think about how we talk about great music: It's "grooving" or "swinging" or "rocking." Nobody ever says, "I really enjoyed their use of inverted suspended triads," or "their application of large-interval pentatonic sequences was fascinating." So, whether you're playing live or recording, time is everyone's responsibility, and you must develop your ability to play in the pocket.

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