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Harmony Guitars Announces the Silhouette, Rebel, and Jupiter Models

A series of reimagined guitars that are built in the company's Kalamazoo, MI factory.

Kalamazoo, MI (June 28, 2019) -- Harmony’s highly anticipated new line of solid body electric guitars are available now, and rolling out across the USA. To celebrate Harmony’s return, the brand has released an evocative video, tracing the ways Harmony guitars have been a part of many people’s lives, connecting generations and inspiring them to make music.

Edwin Wilson, Senior Manager of Guitar Design & Development, BandLab Technologies says: “We’re pleased to introduce Harmony’s three latest guitars to the market, building on the familiar shapes this iconic brand is known for – but reimagined and updated for the rigorous needs of the modern player. We designed these guitars with performance in mind, and with all the attention to detail and quality you would expect from a USA made guitar.”

The Harmony Silhouette, Rebel and Jupiter guitars (US MAP $1,299) are inspired by the shapes and sounds of the past, but reimagined for the modern player. Harmony’s new Standard Series are proudly made in Kalamazoo, MI, USA. The guitars are now rolling out across dealers in the United States, with global availability to follow.

Watch the company's video demo:

For more information:
Harmony

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